Blog

Showing 11 to 15 of 107 blog posts tagged with "Django".

April 8, 2014
by Caleb Smith
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New for PyCon: App for Group Outings + Giant Duck

For PyCon 2014, we’ve been working for the past few months on Duckling, an app to make it easier to find and join casual group outings. Our favorite part of PyCon is meeting up with fellow Pythonistas, but without someone rounding everyone up and sorting the logistics, we’ve ...

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March 25, 2014
by Colin Copeland
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Congrats to PearlHacks Winners (Including Our Intern, Annie)!

Caleb Smith, Caktus developer, awarding the third place prize to TheRightFit creators Bipasa Chattopadhyay, Ping Fu, and Sarah Andrabi.

Many congratulations to the PearlHacks third place winners who won Sphero Balls! The team from UNC’s Computer Science department created TheRightFit, an Android app that helps shoppers know what sizes ...

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February 5, 2014
by Alex Lemann
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Caktus Completes RapidSMS Community Coordinator Development for UNICEF

Colin Copeland, Managing Member at Caktus, has wrapped up work, supported by UNICEF, as the Community Coordinator for the open source RapidSMS project. RapidSMS is a text messaging application development library built on top of the Django web framework. It creates a SMS provider agnostic way of sending and receiving ...

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January 9, 2014
by Dan Poirier
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Managing Events with Explicit Time Zones

Recently we wanted a way to let users create real-life events which could occur in any time zone that the user desired. By default, Django interprets any date/time that the user enters as being in the user’s time zone, but it never displays that time zone, and it ...

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October 30, 2013
by Tobias McNulty
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Using strace to Debug Stuck Celery Tasks

Celery is a great tool for background task processing in Django. We use it in a lot of the custom web apps we build at Caktus, and it's quickly becoming the standard for all variety of task scheduling work loads, from simple to highly complex.

Although rarely, sometimes a ...

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